14 Apr, 2014 25,151 notes

shakespearean-spunk:

"you make my heart beat in iambic pentameter."

no you don’t understand shakespeare literally writes to the beat of your heart

  • that’s why shakespearean actors will sometimes pound their chests in time to the words during readings
  • that’s why you use fluctuations in the rhythm to track your character’s emotional state - any irregularities in the scansion are like the character’s heart stuttering or jumping or skipping a beat
  • that’s why when characters share the rhythm - switching off in the middle of a foot - those characters inevitably have an extraordinarily intimate connection

shakespeare fucking writes viscerally, he is literally in your body, and that, my friend, that is why the best shakespearean actors don’t posture and emote

you have to be fucking alive and passionate and electric - it can’t be intellectual, in the end, it has to be about connection and the sweating, cheering, jeering, bleeding masses you’re performing to, because make no mistake, shakespeare may go to lofty heights, but he only works if you’re just as grounded in the earth. he has to be in your body. he has to be in your body.

holy motherfucking shit i love shakespeare so much, get him in your bones, breathe him in, stomp and rage and pine, dadum dadum dadum dadum dadum, it is literally to the beat of your heart

(via fuckingconversations)

14 Apr, 2014 352,128 notes

astolat:

titleknown:

freedominwickedness:

101st-analborne:

fallbeil:

mugenstyle:

eccecorinna:

wrathofprawn:

for those not in the know, night witches were russian lady bombers who bombed the shit out of german lines in WW2. Thing is though, they had the oldest, noisiest, crappest planes in the entire world. The engines used to conk out halfway through their missions, so they had to climb out on the wings mid flight to restart the props. the planes were also so noisy that to stop germans from hearing them combing and starting up their anti aircraft guns, they’d climb up to a certain height, coast down to german positions, drop their bombs, restart their engines in midair, and get the fuck out of dodge.
their leader flew over 200 missions and was never captured.

how the fuck is this not taught in every single history class ever



pilots (◡‿◡✿) 
girl pilots (◕‿◕✿)
girl pilots killing nazis ✧・゚: *✧・゚:* \(◕ヮ◕✿)/ *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

But, remember, women never did anything in history.

This is laughably incorrect.
Fact 1: Although technologically obsolete as of WWII, the Polikarpov Po-2 “Kukuruznik” biplanes flown by the 588th Night Bomber Regiment were in no way ” the oldest, noisiest, crappest planes in the entire world.” The Po-2 was first flown in 1929 and remained in production until 1953 due to its low cost and extreme reliability. It is, in fact, the second most produced aircraft in history, and the most produced biplane in history. The night bombers flew brand new, specially modified Po-2s fitted with bomb racks and machine guns.
Fact 2: The Po-2 was extremely quiet; Germans nicknamed it the Nähmaschine (“sewing machine”) due to the muted rattling sound its tiny little 99-horsepower radial engine made. The night bombers would fly these quiet little planes just a few meters off the ground, then climb to higher altitude, cut the engine, and glide to the attack point so that the Germans would have no warning of an incoming attack other than wind whistling through the wing bracing-wires. It wasn’t because the engines were unreliable, it was a planned attack pattern.
Fact 3: Saying “their leader flew over 200 missions” is both inaccurate and damning with faint praise. Whereas most combat pilots fly only one or two sorties per day, all of the 588th Night Bomber Regiment pilots flew multiple missions every night, with the record being eighteen missions flown back-to-back-to-back-to-back in a single night. By the end of the war, most of the “Night Witches” had around a thousand combat sorties under their belts.
The Night Witches were THAT fucking badass, and it pisses me off when people get it all wrong because they’re too damn lazy to do their homework.

And this is one of the rare times the correction makes things more badass.

Wow, I now totally want to write the Temeraire-universe story of this regiment.
NIGHT WITCHES <3 <3 <3  

astolat:

titleknown:

freedominwickedness:

101st-analborne:

fallbeil:

mugenstyle:

eccecorinna:

wrathofprawn:

for those not in the know, night witches were russian lady bombers who bombed the shit out of german lines in WW2. Thing is though, they had the oldest, noisiest, crappest planes in the entire world. The engines used to conk out halfway through their missions, so they had to climb out on the wings mid flight to restart the props. the planes were also so noisy that to stop germans from hearing them combing and starting up their anti aircraft guns, they’d climb up to a certain height, coast down to german positions, drop their bombs, restart their engines in midair, and get the fuck out of dodge.

their leader flew over 200 missions and was never captured.

how the fuck is this not taught in every single history class ever

pilots (◡‿◡✿) 

girl pilots (◕◕✿)

girl pilots killing nazis ✧・゚: *✧・゚:* \(◕◕✿)/ *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

But, remember, women never did anything in history.

This is laughably incorrect.

Fact 1: Although technologically obsolete as of WWII, the Polikarpov Po-2 “Kukuruznik” biplanes flown by the 588th Night Bomber Regiment were in no way ” the oldest, noisiest, crappest planes in the entire world.” The Po-2 was first flown in 1929 and remained in production until 1953 due to its low cost and extreme reliability. It is, in fact, the second most produced aircraft in history, and the most produced biplane in history. The night bombers flew brand new, specially modified Po-2s fitted with bomb racks and machine guns.

Fact 2: The Po-2 was extremely quiet; Germans nicknamed it the Nähmaschine (“sewing machine”) due to the muted rattling sound its tiny little 99-horsepower radial engine made. The night bombers would fly these quiet little planes just a few meters off the ground, then climb to higher altitude, cut the engine, and glide to the attack point so that the Germans would have no warning of an incoming attack other than wind whistling through the wing bracing-wires. It wasn’t because the engines were unreliable, it was a planned attack pattern.

Fact 3: Saying “their leader flew over 200 missions” is both inaccurate and damning with faint praise. Whereas most combat pilots fly only one or two sorties per day, all of the 588th Night Bomber Regiment pilots flew multiple missions every night, with the record being eighteen missions flown back-to-back-to-back-to-back in a single night. By the end of the war, most of the “Night Witches” had around a thousand combat sorties under their belts.

The Night Witches were THAT fucking badass, and it pisses me off when people get it all wrong because they’re too damn lazy to do their homework.

And this is one of the rare times the correction makes things more badass.

Wow, I now totally want to write the Temeraire-universe story of this regiment.

NIGHT WITCHES <3 <3 <3  

(via fuckingconversations)

13 Apr, 2014 1 note

11 Apr, 2014 4 notes

"Deep down I knew perfectly well that it doesn’t much matter whether you die at thirty or at seventy, since in either case other men and women will naturally go on living—and for thousands of years. In fact, nothing could be clearer. Whether it was now or twenty years from now, I would still be the one dying."

Albert Camus, The Stranger
08 Apr, 2014

"She drove into the parking lot of the hospital and found a space close to the front door. She felt she was in some obscure way responsible for what had happened to the child. She let her thoughts move to the Negro family. She remembered the name Franklin and the table that was covered with hamburger papers, and the teenaged girl staring at her as she drew on her cigarette. “Don’t have children,” she told the girl’s image as she entered the front door of the hospital. “For God’s sake, don’t.”"

Raymond Carver, “A Small Good Thing”
27 Mar, 2014 1 note

The trial was adjourned. As I was leaving the courthouse on my way back to the van, I recognized for a brief moment the smell and color of the summer evening. In the darkness of my mobile prison I could make out one by one, as if from the depths of my exhaustion, all the familiar sounds of a town I loved and of a certain time of day when I used to feel happy. The cries of the newspaper vendors in the already languid air, the last few birds in the square, the shouts of the sandwich sellers, the screech of the streetcars turning sharply through the upper town, and that hum in the sky before night engulfs the port: all this mapped out for me a route I knew so well before going to prison and which now I traveled blind. Yes, it was the hour when, a long time ago, I was perfectly content. What awaited me back then was always a night of easy, dreamless sleep. And yet something changed, since it was back to my cell that I went to wait for the next day…as if familiar paths traced in summer skies could lead as easily to prison as to the sleep of the innocent.

- Albert Camus, The Stranger

26 Mar, 2014 24,636 notes

"You are valuable because you exist. Not because of what you do or what you have done - but simply because you are."
26 Mar, 2014 201 notes

"

Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing
and rightdoing there is a field.
I’ll meet you there.

When the soul lies down in that grass
the world is too full to talk about.

"
26 Mar, 2014 85 notes

"One day you fall for this boy. And he touches you with his fingers. And he burns holes in your skin with his mouth. And it hurts when you look at him. And it hurts when you don’t. And it feels like someone’s cut you open with a jagged piece of glass."

Maureen Medved (via quoteworld)

(via bustyzombiehookersfromspace)

26 Mar, 2014 1,276 notes

aseaofquotes:

Audrey Niffenegger, The Time Traveler’s Wife

aseaofquotes:

Audrey Niffenegger, The Time Traveler’s Wife

26 Mar, 2014 1,349 notes


Rosemary Williams. Photo: Stanley Kubrick (1949)

Rosemary Williams. Photo: Stanley Kubrick (1949)

(Source: crashbamboom, via suicideblonde)

25 Feb, 2014

The Mochila Review: National Student Literary Magazine   

The Mochila Review is a literary magazine open to all undergraduate students who want to publish there prose, poetry, art work, and even comics! Submissions close April 1st.

03 Feb, 2014 219 notes

steampunksteampunk:irisabout
This is how I wish I looked when I&#8217;m out writing.

steampunksteampunk:irisabout

This is how I wish I looked when I’m out writing.

03 Feb, 2014 35,420 notes

brokenponycutiemark:

leupagus:

best fanart of all time

Now I have Fatboy Slim in my head. DANGIT.

brokenponycutiemark:

leupagus:

best fanart of all time

Now I have Fatboy Slim in my head. DANGIT.

(Source: therealnerduniverse, via simplyringrose)

03 Feb, 2014 5,058 notes

aseaofquotes:

Shel Silverstein, “Whatif”

aseaofquotes:

Shel Silverstein, “Whatif”

(via aseaofquotes)

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